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  #11  
Old 09-03-2013, 07:43 AM
mick78 mick78 is offline
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As swizzle explained, on a light FWD car, the front brakes do most of the job, so rear discs are not that necessary performance wise (and add cost). But to a certain extent, it also has to do with disc brakes need "stress" to live long. On small econo hatchbacks with rear discs (they are more common in performance keen Europe), they regularly corrode away long before they would need replacement wear wise, as they are rarely "doing the real job"(whilst a larger sedan - with a lot of weight also in the back, often even more than 50% - is often driven on the motorway, where heavier braking form high speeds is common, discs perform better, in city driving - natural habitat of small hatches - the "disc performance area" is hardly touched). Plus, as hand brake, drums work better. So in the end, they might even be a better solution on small light FWD cars, especially if we are not talking hot hatch performance...
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Old 09-04-2013, 06:02 PM
63Bonneville 63Bonneville is offline
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The last topic has been well presented via Swizzle and mick78, and makes sense, then again, it appears that only the lower-end and smaller economy offerings now appear to have rear-drums, and even that number appears less and less. My thoughts, too, are perhaps that rear-discs are sexier and give a sense of being more advanced vs. rear drums on the lower-end models, but are a necessity on higher-end and larger models from there. Also, anti-lock has been offered on front-disc/rear-drum models for some time, for, previously, I had a 1993 Ford Explorer Sport (the 2-door version) and that had front-disc/rear-drum 4-wheel anti-lock brakes. The 1991 and 1992 model Explorers had only rear-wheel anti-lock, and those were drum-brakes.
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  #13  
Old 09-05-2013, 01:37 PM
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Rear brakes (brakes in general?) could actually go the way of the dinosaur on hybrids/EVs because literally the electric motor can very efficiently do that job.
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Old 09-05-2013, 01:42 PM
mick78 mick78 is offline
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Originally Posted by 63Bonneville View Post
The 1991 and 1992 model Explorers had only rear-wheel anti-lock, and those were drum-brakes.
As in breaking weight shifts forwards, usually rear wheels tend to lock up first, and teh ruin directional stability. Thus, rear wheel ABS was an ok compromise, at least better than none...

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Rear brakes (brakes in general?) could actually go the way of the dinosaur on hybrids/EVs because literally the electric motor can very efficiently do that job.
I don't think that an emergency stop can be done without proper breaks, however for everyday driving, that surely makes sense in an EV (after all, how often do you do an emergency stop at full breaking power?). But as a back up for maximum force, surely I can't see breaks disappear form EVs (after all, what would stop them when the engine is off?)
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Old 09-06-2013, 01:48 AM
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I don't think that an emergency stop can be done without proper breaks, however for everyday driving, that surely makes sense in an EV (after all, how often do you do an emergency stop at full breaking power?). But as a back up for maximum force, surely I can't see breaks disappear form EVs (after all, what would stop them when the engine is off?)
Reverse the polarity in an electric motor and it could actually decelerate the car TOO quickly. As long as it's on battery power, the polarity could be reversed. It is certainly intriguing given how much weight could be replaced by software.
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Old 09-06-2013, 03:54 AM
63Bonneville 63Bonneville is offline
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I don't think that an emergency stop can be done without proper breaks, however for everyday driving, that surely makes sense in an EV (after all, how often do you do an emergency stop at full breaking power?). But as a back up for maximum force, surely I can't see breaks disappear form EVs (after all, what would stop them when the engine is off?)
I've driven a Tesla S Sedan, and when you let off of the accelerator, the regenerative brakes tend to slow down significantly on their own, and without the application of the brake pedal. This can come in handy in a traffic-jam, or some stop & go city driving. Of course, you can adjust a setting for the Tesla's regenerative braking to have it less intense, where you would have to apply the brake more.
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